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Quebec Local Foods

Seasonal Produce & Regional Specialties

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Good living, including fine food, has long been held in esteem in Quebec. Its French heritage is evident in its cuisine and regional specialties, but so too is its North American climate. Artisan cheese and maple syrup, foie gras and apples are just some examples of what makes eating in Quebec so grand. Learn more below. Know of something that should be here? Tell us about it!

Quebec Seasonal Produce

Box of Endives
Photo © Molly Watson
Quebec is famous for its delicious apples and wild blueberries, as well as traditional French items like Belgian endive and shallots. Learn what to expect when with this Guide to Quebec Seasonal Fruits and Vegetables.

Quebec Markets

Stand at Marché du Vieux Port in Quebec City
Photo © Molly Watson

Quebec is full of fine farmers markets. The two best known are Montréal's Jean Talon Market and Quebec City's Marché du Vieux Port.

For more markets in Montreal, see this listing of Montreal Public Markets from About.com's Guide to Montreal.

Quebec Food Baskets

Photo © Molly Watson
What are known in the U.S. as CSA are often called food baskets or paniers de la semaine (literally "baskets of the week") in Quebec. About.com's Guide to Montreal has compiled this list of Montreal Organic Food Baskets as well as this list of organic farms near Montreal.

Quebec Artisan Cheese

Its French heritage and green pastures has led Quebec to establish an enviable farmstead cheese industry centered on small family operations. Brie, Camembert, triple cream, and blue are all made, as well as aged cheddar. Cabriole, Mamirolle, Le Metis, Bluebry, Ermite, Le Pied de vent, and Le Bleu de la Montonniere are all worth looking for.

Quebec Foie Gras

Au Gout d'Autrefois Birds
Photo © Molly Watson
Its French heritage is also evident in its foie gras production. There are some large, but mainly small farms that raise ducks and geese for their fattened, rich livers. One such farm, Au Gout d'Autrefois, uses humane, no-forced-feeding methods to create this culinary specialty.

Poutine

Smoked Meat Poutine
Photo © Molly Watson
Poutine - a big bowl of French fries, fresh cheese curds, and brown gravy - originated in Quebec. Diner cooks and fine restaurant chefs have played with the combination, adding everything from mushrooms to sweet potatoes, lobster to foie gras. Learn more About Poutine here.

Montreal Bagels

St-Viateur Bagelshop
Photo © Molly Watson
Montreal bagels are smaller, chewier, and sweeter than their New York counterparts. Egg and honey in the dough and being cooked in wood-fired ovens makes all the difference. Learn more about Montreal Bagels.

Montreal Smoked Meat

Montreal Smoked Meat
Photo © Molly Watson
The uninitiated may dismiss Montreal smoked meat as so much pastrami, and this regional specialty certainly sounds a lot like pastrami: a brisket, seasoned and smoked and sliced into a rye bread sandwich. One big difference, however, makes Montreal smoked meat unique: it is steamed after being smoked. The result is a supremely tender meat. Learn more About Montreal Smoked Meat here.

Tartes au Sucre

Tarte au Sucre
Photo © Molly Watson
The best description of tartes au sucre is a pecan pie without the pecans. They are intensely sweet, with a ooey-gooey filling in a basic pie crust. The best versions, in my humble opinion, are made with maple syrup. Learn more About Tartes au Sucre here.

Local Eating Resources

Get started on finding the best of local eating in Quebec with this Foodies Guide to Quebec.

For those looking to get to locavore status in Montreal, these resources for local eating will come in handy!

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  4. More Local Foods Resources
  5. Find Local Foods In Canada
  6. Quebec Local Foods

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