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Types of Large Radishes

From Black to Watermelon

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Large radishes come in many shapes and sizes - see the variety here, including the fairly common large cream-colored daikon radishes.

Black Radishes (Spanish Radishes)

Photo © Molly Watson

Black radishes (a.k.a. Spanish radishes) have a truly black exterior that covers a snowy white flesh. Black radishes are sharp when raw, and add a nice bite to salads and raw vegetable plates. When sliced paper-thin, they make beautiful garnishes. Scrub these radishes clean in order to keep the brilliant contrast between the black peel and the white interior. Black radishes also make tasty gratins and are delicious when cut into wedges and added to pans of roasted vegetables.

Daikon Radishes

Photo © Kaz Chiba courtesy of Getty Images

Daikon Radishes are the most commonly available (and widely known) large radish variety. They are often pickled or dried, but are delicious grated into soups or added to roasted or braised vegetables. They aren't usually eaten raw, but can be bright, crispy delights when peeled and cut into very thin slices.

If you find daikon radishes being sold with their greens still attached, grab them! Such freshly harvested daikon have a softer flavor and their greens are equally edible.

Watermelon Radishes

Photo © Molly Watson
Watermelon radishes are so-named for an obvious reason to anyone who has ever cut into their green skin and and seen their brilliant red-pink interior. Scrub clean, cut into wedges, and serve as a sharp and beautiful crudité or cut into thin sticks to add to salads.

Horseradish

Photo © Molly Watson
If you've only ever had jarred horseradish you need to give yourself a treat and try the real stuff. Bright and pungent, without the bitter aftertaste sometimes found in jarred versions, fresh horseradish perks up any meal and is especially good with the heavier roasts and stews of cold weather cooking, which works out nicely since it's harvested in the fall and stores well over the winter.

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